Posts published in Opinion

UK at RISK? Ministry of Defence faces a £21BILLION budget shortfall over next 10 years

By Matthew Robinson on Saturday, May 12, 2018

THE MINISTRY of Defence (MoD) faces a whopping £21billion funding shortfall over the next decade, placing the purchase of vital new equipment including fighter jets, submarines and armoured vehicles in jeopardy, according to the Public Accounts Committee which scrutinises the MoD’s spending. The PAC’s report into the MoD’s ten-year equipment plan for 2017-27 stated: “The ministry simply does not have enough to buy all the equipment it says it needs.”…

India and Pakistan tensions reach diplomatic PEAK in FURIOUS STAND OFF at UN meeting

By Andy Anderson on Friday, May 11, 2018

PAKISTAN raised tensions with India at a UN General Assembly session in New York after a Pakistani official made reference to the issue of the Kashmir conflict, which India rejected as being irrelevant to the work of the committee. Masood Anwar, Pakistan’s Permanent Mission to the UN, said: “The world we live today is marred with conflict and strife while we maintain unity in fighting terrorism and extremism. “Countering the…

Civil Affairs minimizes burdens, fears around globe

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

U.S. Soldiers quickly walk through a rowdy crowd of civilians, all of whom are chanting, tossing vegetables and pumping their fists in the dust-clouded air. The outrage is apparent and is reflected in the terse greeting from the local mayor and nod of acknowledgement from the police chief. The team of four, all civil affairs Soldiers, are led to a large room filled to capacity, and after quick introductions, the…

US relaunches Second Fleet in war preparations against Russia

By Bill Van Auken on Monday, May 7, 2018

The US Navy announced on Friday that it is relaunching its Second Fleet, a naval force to be deployed in the North Atlantic and directed at preparing for military confrontation with Russia. The fleet had been mothballed in 2011 under the Obama administration based upon the assessment that the likelihood of war with Russia had declined. Funding for the fleet, it was argued, could be better spent on buying new…

US is waking up to the deadly threat of cyber war

By David A. Andelman on Monday, May 7, 2018

The American military is recognizing that the cyber battlefield can be every bit as lethal as the traditional one. It can target systems from nuclear power plants to emergency responders — certainly, a threat to our way of life — as any device manufactured to kill soldiers, sailors, or marines, can bring down planes or sink ships. The question is whether we are doing enough, quickly enough, to counter the…

Many countries suffer from shrinking working-age populations

Saturday, May 5, 2018

MANY developed countries have anti-immigration political parties, which terrify the incumbents and sometimes break into government. Lithuania is unusual in having an anti-emigration party. The small Baltic country, with a population of 2.8m (and falling), voted heavily in 2016 for the Lithuanian Farmer and Greens’ Union, which pledged to do something to stem the outward tide. As with some promises made elsewhere to cut immigration, not much has happened as…

Who’s glad, sad and mad about EU budget plan

By Lili Bayer, Emmet Livingstone and Laura Greenhalgh on Saturday, May 5, 2018

A long battle lies ahead but some likely winners and losers have already emerged. The European Commission’s plan for the next long-term EU budget has ministers, lobbyists, farmers, scientists, mayors and many others scanning spreadsheets and poring over PDFs to find out how they will be affected. It will be weeks before the Commission provides more details of the €1.279 trillion plan — which will then be the subject of months,…

The Globalization of War

By Paul Hellyer on Friday, May 4, 2018

The Globalization of War is an extraordinarily important book. It tags the origin of a long series of wars and conflicts, from the end of World War II to the present, as being direct products of U.S.  Foreign Policy. Nothing happens by accident. U.S. provocateurs, usually agents of the CIA, incite one conflict after another in what Michel Chossudovsky labels America’s “Long War” against Humanity. It comprises a war on…

Can the U.S. Navy Brave the Waves of Autonomous Warfare?

By Olivia Miltner on Wednesday, May 2, 2018

It was January 1945, and the Nazis knew the end was near. The German ocean liner Wilhelm Gustloff, designed to accommodate 1,900, was packed with more than 10,000 soldiers and refugees when it ventured into the freezing Baltic Sea, part of efforts to evacuate two million Germans out of eastern Prussia and away from an advancing Soviet army. But a Soviet submarine spotted the ship and fired three torpedoes into…

After Macron high, Trump’s Merkel comedown

By Matthew Karnitschnig on Friday, April 27, 2018

After days of pomp, kisses, lavish dinners and a picture-perfect tree planting, U.S. President Donald Trump is about to be confronted with Europe’s sterner side, courtesy of Angela Merkel. When the president sits down opposite the German chancellor in the White House on Friday, the niceties will be kept to a minimum. Unlike French President Emmanuel Macron, Merkel will not be rubbing elbows (either literally or figuratively) with Trump. There…